April Tea Party Winners

Six Year Blog Anniversary WINNERS: Carla Gade - Pattern for Romance audiobooks go to Andrea Stephens and Megs Minutes and winner of Love's Compas is Terressa Thornton, PEGG THOMAS's signed copy of The Pony Express Romance Collection is Debra Smith, Janet Grunst's debut book goes to Kathleen Maher, Carrie Fancett Pagels' winner's choice goes to: Connie Saunders, Denise Weimer's print winner of, Angela Couch's winner's choice goes to Susan Johnson, Debra E. Marvin reader's choice of any of her novellas or a paperback of Saguaro Sunset novella -- Teri DiVincenzo and Lynne Feurstein, Jennifer Hudson Taylor's "For Love or Country" go to: Lucy Reynolds, Bree Herron and Mary Ellen Goodwin, Shannon McNear's winners are Becky Dempsey for Pioneer Christmas and Michelle Hayes for Most Eligible Bachelor, Roseanna White's winner for Love Finds You in Annapolis is Becky Smith.

Wednesday, July 31, 2013

Historic 1780 McGulpin House on Mackinac Island, by Carrie Fancett Pagels

McGulpin House c. 1780, Mackinac Island

So often we overlook some of our late-comers to America, prior to the American Revolution.  One such place was the area now called Michigan.  Fort Michilimackinac was on the Mackinaw City side of the straits and became part of the British territory after the French-Indian War.  The fort moved to Mackinac Island as the American Revolution continued, with the Mackinaw City fort being less defensible than one on the island.

One fascinating house on present-day Mackinac Island is the McGulpin House.  There are many theories as to who the original house belonged to (click here for Michigan State Parks post.) With the purchase of admission to Fort Mackinac and Fort Michilimackinac you are also allowed entry to the McGulpin House.  The day I visited, a lovely Girl Scout cadet from the Detroit area was responsible for visitors.  

One of the things I enjoyed most was where part of the exterior wall (of newer origin) was removed to show the original building and was covered with glass. As you can see from the photograph, beneath the clapboard exterior is a log cabin.  Given the age of the cabin I would guess its construction to have been of cedar, which is readily available in the area. (My great-grandparents' log home is part of the Taquamenon Logging Museum and is made of cedar, also.)

Here's a view of the layers of the interior of the McGilpin home as well:

Although the style of the home is referred to by Wiki as French-Canadian working class, the original log cabin structure greatly resembles those built in the Shenandoah valley of Virginia during that time period. 

Surrounding the McGuilpin property is a fence that should keep out intruders and keep animals inside. 


But the lovely lilacs that bloom on Mackinac Island are sure to draw visitors.  If you get the chance, make it a point to visit Mackinac Island during their amazing Lilac Festival, held each year in early to mid-June.

The island is full of hundreds of varieties of lilacs, all of which scent the air with a beautiful scent.  One can almost imagine being an 18th century Frenchwoman living on the newly-occupied Mackinac Island. My research for my manuscript, set on Mackinac Island, truly could not have been any sweeter!

10 comments:

  1. Beautiful! I love the window into the interior construction of the building. What a great tour.

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  2. That's very neat. Thanks for sharing!

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    1. I have walked by this house dozens of times but this was the first time I went in!!! So glad I did!

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  3. Mackinac Island is just beautiful during the lilac season! Great post about the house! The fort is a great place to visit and learn about. We love wandering thru the old cemeteries and see the really old headstones. The history on the island is amazing!

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    1. It is so fabulous to be there. And it is so close to home. The islanders come over to the Upper Peninsula side to store their vehicles and shop. You are right--the history there is awesome!

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  4. The lilacs are beautiful, Carrie. Mackinac Island is also famous for its fudge.

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    1. It was like being in heaven to inhale the lilacs everywhere, Janet!!!

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  5. Mackinac Island is one of my very favorite places in the world! Lovely blog and post.

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  6. What a great trip, Carrie. I really enjoy these posts about our writer research trips. What a neat place and those lilacs!!

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