Winter Tea Party winners: Angela's book,THE SCARLET COAT, will go to: Print copy- Andrea Stephens; e-book copy - Catherine Wight!

LUCY REYNOLDS has a table topper quilt on the way, and winners of the Valentine Ebook Collection are: Deanna Stevens, Caryl Kane, Anne Payne and Winnie Thomas. With thanks to all who joined in!

Sunday, July 24, 2011

Making Chocolate Eighteenth Century Style

Submitted by Laurie Alice Eakes


To Make Confectionary Drops

Take double refined sugar, pound and sift it through a hair sieve, not too
fine; then sift it through a silk sieve to take out all the fine dust which
would destroy the beauty of the drop. Put the sugar into a clean pan, and
moisten it with any favourite aromatic...Colour it with a small quantity of
liquid carmine, or any other colour, ground fine. Take a small pan with a
lip, fill it three parts with paste, place it on a small stove, the half hole
being the size of the pan, and stir the sugar with a little ivory or bone
handle, until it becomes liquid. When it almost boils, take it from the fire
and continue to stir it: if it be too moist, take a little of the powdered
sugar, and add a spoonful to the paste, and stir it till it is of such a
consistence as to run without too much extension. Have a tin plate, very
clean and smooth; take the little pan in the left hand, and hold in the right
a bit of iron, copper, or silver wire, four inches long, to take off the drop
from the lip of the pan, and let it fall regularly on the tin plate; two
hours afterwards, take off the drops with the blade of a knife.


To Make Chocolate Drops
Scrape the chocolate to powder, and put an ounce to each pound of sugar;
moisten the paste with clear water, work it as above, only take care to use
all the paste prepared, as if it be put on the fire a second time, it
greases, and the drop is not of the proper thickness.

Note: A pound of sugar is about 2 cups by modern measurements. I have no idea how much an ounce of cocoa powder is, but this would be like Hersheys cocoa powder for baking.

4 comments:

  1. I have no idea what aromatic or carmine is... none! But it sounds interesting.

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  2. Carmine was a coloring. I know it was used in rouge and lipstick, too. lip rouge, I should say.

    This header should say Making Chocolate Drops. This sounds like those icky candies I got once as a child where one peeled these little half circles of colored dots off of a sheet of paper. I remember theyw ere kind of hard and basically just tasted kind of sweet, but they were pretty. The chocolate would be better.

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  3. This looks like a yummy recipe. Thanks for sharing it with us, Laurie Alice!

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  4. An aromatic is a flavoring. Try any oil essence, like mint, orange or cinnamon. Lovely! Chocolate drops are sometime called chocolate buttons, between 1/2 inch to 1 inch in diameter after it spreads out and cools.

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