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September Tea Party Winners: Janet Grunst's -- A Heart For Freedom for Chappy Debbie
audible of A Heart Set Free for Lucy Reynolds Roseanna White's is Wilani Wahl -- Debra E. Marvin's -- Kailey Behrendt paperback of Dangerous Deception, Carrie Fancett Pagels' -- The Victorian Christmas Brides collection goes to Nancy McLeroy!
October Tea Party winner for The Cumberland Bride goes to Teri DiVincenzo!!

Monday, January 8, 2018

Giveaway of The Meadowsweet Shawl

I'm so excited about my new release in the Bouquet of Brides Collection. My story, In Sheep's Clothing, let me combine so many of the things that I love. It has history, fiber arts, and even sheep!

I've always loved history. I was blessed to grow up with a granddad who was a natural storyteller. He lived through so many changes, he knew so many interesting people - including Henry Ford, and although he never graduated high school, he was always well-read on current events. His stories captivated me from my earliest memories.

At the age of nine, I learned to knit in our local 4-H club. Using yarn to create loops and fashioning something both useful and artistic captured me from the start. I was sixteen and showing rabbits in 4-H when I met a lady who raised Angora rabbits. She came to a rabbit show with her rabbits ... and a spinning wheel. I was hooked. It took me a few months to save enough money to purchase my first spinning wheel, but it was worth every penny.


I was thirty before we had the land and opportunity to buy my first sheep. I started with a mixed flock but quickly switched over to registered Border Leicesters. Today, I have just a remnant of the original flock, but they still give me more than enough wool to keep my fingers busy.

To celebrate the release of this close-to-my-heart story, I'm giving away one of my signature shawls. The Meadowsweet Shawl is named after the lamb in In Sheep's Clothing. It's natural white Border Leicester wool raised right here on our farm. I raised the sheep, sheared the sheep, washed the wool, carded the wool, spun the yarn, plied the yarn, and then knitted the shawl. It's 100% made in Michigan. The shawl is crescent shaped with a raised back to keep your neck cozy warm. The front can be left to curl, as in the photo, or tied or wrapped to close the front.

To be entered in the drawing, subscribe to my newsletter by January 31, 2018. That's it! If you've already subscribed, then you're already entered to win.


PeggThomas.com


23 comments:

  1. Love the shawl and would love to win it. I enjoy wearing shawls. Blessings on your writing.

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    1. Shawls used to be standard clothing for women. I'm tickled that they are coming back and am finding lots of other women who love them too.

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  2. Congratulations on your novella, Pegg!
    How exciting that you are carrying on your grandfather's tradition of storytelling and your love of history in your novellas/books. I think he would love that. The shawl is beautiful and I love that you do everything from raising the sheep to the finish product!
    Blessings, Tina

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    1. Aww ... thanks. Granddad would approve, I'm sure.

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  3. Oh, my gosh. That shawl is so lovely and to think you did it all yourself. I do a smidge of knitting but just buy the yarn I need! What an accomplishment. I subscribed! Here's hoping to be able to keep warm w/ your shawl. This Michigan weather has been soooo cold. Heat wave coming in the middle of the week though--40s-50s. Yay! Thank you for the opportunity.

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    1. Thank you for stopping by! Nice to meet another Michigander.

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  4. I love the shawl! The fact that you did everything yourself to make it is incredible. I'm definitely going to sign up for your newsletter so I have a chance to win it.

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  5. I am a new subscriber. I looked up a fleece photo of Border Leicesters. Happy to see your posting here and would like to read your novella! The shawl would be wonderful to wear when I come across varying temperatures in buildings. Kathleen ~ Lane Hill House

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    1. Border Leicester is a breed that was developed on the border of England and Scotland. They are a hardy breed, easy keepers with good mothering ability that also produce an awesome fleece. They'll always be my breed of choice. :)

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  6. Crissy Yoder ShamionJanuary 9, 2018 at 10:27 AM

    Congratulations Pegg!
    I am looking forward to reading! What a beautiful shall!!!
    Subcribing For sure!!!!

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  7. Great article, Pegg! The shawl is gorgeous.

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    1. Thank you! The drawing is open to everyone, readers and writers alike.

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  8. I'm subscribed already. The shawl is gorgeous. Whoever is the recipient will be so blessed. The fact that you raised, sheared the sheep and did everything from the "ground up", so to speak makes that a most precious gift. You are so amazing! sonja dot nishimoto at gmail dot com

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  9. As one who works with fiber every day, I recognize beautiful work when I see it, and this certainly fits the category!! I find the ability to make something from start to finish very interesting. That is for sharing. I am subscribed to your newsletter.
    bettimace at gmail dot com

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  10. Beautiful shawl! Wish I could knit that well. My knitting is mostly scarves. Thanks for the chance.

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    1. It's easy to get better ... just do more of it! :)

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  11. I signed up. The shawl is amazingly beautiful. Thank you for the chance. Blessings

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  12. I signed up. The shawl is so pretty and to think you did it from start to finish! There is a group of spinners that meet at our local library. And then they display their wares. So cool!

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