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Tea Party Winners: Carla Gade's winner is Becky Dempsey, Andrea Boeshaar's winner Caryl Kane, Gina Welborn's winner Jasmine A., Carrie Fancett Pagels' winners book copy -- Lynda Edwards, teacup and saucer -- Wendy Shoults

Monday, May 6, 2013

The Spinning Room: What did colonial women dream of?


 
Welcome to Colonial Quill's Spinning Room! This is the place we gather for discussion around our "spinning wheels", as women did in colonial days.

Today's topic is inspired by Gustave Courbet's 1853 painting, The sleeping spinner.

What did colonial women dream of?



Feel free to join in, one and all, in character if you wish.

12 comments:

  1. I've not come in character but I've been thinking about this, and with the research I've been doing recently, I really must say I think many a colonial woman would dream of a time without war. War looming, talk of war, war coming to their doorsteps. While their men talked politics and debated the pros and cons of the larger world, women would want a world where their sons did not go off never to return.

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    1. I so agree! How unimaginable it must have been to see your men go off to war, husbands, sons, brothers, fathers. It was all a physical burden on them too as the women had to pick up the slack of the tasks their husbands and sons did. Hard times!

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  2. What a gorgeous painting. And Deb, I agree with you. What a burden to think of living in a new world without your husband and sons by your hearth side to lend their help and cheer.
    I would add that I would dream of little fairies to weed my garden, spin my flax, knead my dough and gather my clothes off the line. And I might dream of the old world, with its relative cultivation and peace.

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    1. I bet many women dreamed of those little fairies! Work was hard and unending then. A little help would have been appreciated!

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  3. I have a friend who spins and she is going to teach me to card, dye and spin , lordwilling next week. I love old fashioned skills and love your website.
    Blessings
    Linda Marie Bradt Finn

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    1. Linda, thanks for coming by! How wonderful that you will learn to spin. I know a great many ladies who would love to have that opportunity.

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  4. Colonial women began to think of having their own voice, perhaps in a more subtle context that we consider it today. But they were also women of influence and wanted to be heard.

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  5. Love this post! I often wonder what many colonial women dreamed of, and I must say that what has already been mentioned is SO true. I like to imagine they dreamed of a life of freedom, peace and prosperity. And for something light, I bet they dreamed of at least one full day without chores! Anyway, thanks Carla!

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  6. I don't think they dreamed at all. They were so exhausted by the end of the day that they would probably go into a deep, deep sleep....oblivious to anything. I've had nights like that, so exhausted and once my head hit the pillow, I was dead to the world....only to be awakened too soon by an alarm clock or a barking dog. And I could not recall dreaming. Well, that's my thoughts about it. :o)
    God bless.

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  7. Glenye Justice here and I dream of finding my father and having him home with us again. I'd given up dreaming of marrying but with the new indentured man's arrival I find myself chasing away silly daydreams of sharing a cottage with him. Of course if Father does come back he'd never allow it anyway so...

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  8. I had the chance today to visit with Alice Bradford of New Plimoth and asked her that very question! She was a most gracious lady and I enjoyed her company very much! Her answer was much in line with Amber and Chaplain Debbie. Mistress Bradford told me that personally she dreamt of sleep or having the time to do that. She shared with me a much broader dream too, which I'll have the chance to tell you about on Friday!

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  9. Patience Moore here. 'Tis been such a turmoiled time in the Philadelphia area. I'd really like to see the rebellious talk quiet down.

    I dream of my second son, David, settled as an apprentice to a good master. I dread the day when my daughter, Sarah, weds and has a home of her own. She is such a help and comfort to me.

    And I remember fondly the days when Andrew and I were first wed. Building the house and forge occupied our minds before the children came. Those were such good days.

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