CONGRATULATIONS

Carrie Fancett Pagels' "The Substitute Bride" in O' Little Town of Christmas collection is a 2016 Published MAGGIE AWARD FINALIST in Romance Novellas!!!


Tea Party winners: Roseanna M. White, Denise Weimer's print copy of Widow goes to Andrea Stephens, Debra E. Marvin's winners for Ebook collection are Cheryl Baranski and Rachel Koppendrayer, Carrie Fancett Pagels' ebook collection goes to Joan Arning and paperback to Connie, Gina Welborn's winner is Regina Fujitani, Gabrielle Meyer's paperback copy of A Mother in the Making is Teri Geist DiVincenzo

Friday, December 7, 2012

The Spinning Room: What Makes You Read Colonial Fiction?



Please join us in the Spinning Room today and share with us what makes you read Colonial American fiction? Is there a Colonial American novel that you just couldn't put down? What elements in Colonial American fiction do you enjoy most? When did you first begin reading this sub-genre? Do tell!
All commenters will be eligible to win a copy of Carla Olson Gade's Colonial Courtships!


52 comments:

  1. I've always been a fan of American and British History. Visiting Boston and Philadelphia should make everyone a fan of Colonial Fiction, don't you think?

    Seeing the John Adams miniseries really reminded me of how much I love this time period. I'm so glad there's a place to go to find such great authors in one spot. Thanks, Quillers!

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    1. I so agree with you, Deb. And can you believe I have not seen John Adams? Must do soon now that we have our Roku and Netflix.

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  2. I have been entralled with the colonial period since childhood, and my interest was renewed when I started researching my early New England family ancestry about 15 years ago. I've always enjoyed classics in the colonial period like The Witch of Blackbird Pond and The Scarlett Letter, and more recently novels by Kathleen Kent. But I was totally swept me away with this sub-genre of historical Christian romance such as Laura Frantz's and MaryLu Tyndall's! And I love writing in this era!

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    1. Oh, you brought back a good memory. The Witch of Blackbird Pond was my introduction to Colonial era fiction, and that book has stayed with me since childhood.

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  3. I've always enjoyed reading colonial fiction, and I have loved with a passion the early American/Federal period in our country in particular. At 13, I began babysitting for neighbors and noticed the different styles of furniture and houses. The homes with wooden floors (not inlaid carpet), oval braided rugs, and rocking chairs held my interest the most. Later, I studied interior design and learned the history of period furniture and architecture. I recommend a visit to the Henry Ford Museum and Greenfield Village in Dearborn, Michigan if you have the chance. That's history up close and a wonderful trip back in time.

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    1. That is so fascinating to see the connection you have from your interest in historical furniture and home design. I'm also very interested in that and love contributing that type of detail in my novels.

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  4. My real interest began several years ago when our church put up a chart depicting the 'Trail of Blood' (depicting Christian Martyrs since Christ) for our Home Missions Conference. I was intrigued to learn of the martyrs in the American Colonies (being Canadian I'd always heard the other side of the coin - that people came to America to escape religious persecution). So I began researching these colonial martyrs and was captivated - particularly when I learned that my own ancestors, who came to escape persecution in Europe, came as indentured servants and would have experienced similar issues here. I love reading of the great men who fought for the religious freedoms we have today.

    Novels? Well Siri Mitchell's Love's Pursuit had one of the most powerful affects on me of any novel written in that era. Then MaryLu Tyndall's novels captivated me and soon I was completely sold on Colonial Fiction.

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    1. Fascinating family history, Lynn. I can see why you'd be entralled with the era. It's in your blood!

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  5. I grew up on the east coast, but my love affair with the 18th century (history and fiction) didn't begin until shortly after I moved to the west coast in the 1990s, thanks to the books I fell in with here. Living so far away from the "scene of the time" makes research for my 18th century-set novels a bit trickier. It also spurs me to do more thorough research, and along the way learn stuff I might never have known to look for, which in turn inspires new stories. It's wonderful cycle.

    For all who stop by today (Friday December 7)and see this comment, be sure to head to Amazon, where Laura Frantz's debut Colonial novel, The Frontiersman's Daughter, is free for Kindle. I don't know how long that sale will last, so don't delay!

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    1. Thanks for mentioning that, Lori! A FREE colonial!

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  6. I have loved British and American history all my life. Having spent many years, at different times, in Virginia, I'm partial to the rich history of the Old Dominion. I have enjoyed most of the colonial fiction I've read, but I suppose one of my all time favorites is "Follow The River" by James Alexander Thom. It's a riveting novel based on the true story of Mary Ingles.

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    1. I haven't heard of Follow the River. Thanks for telling us about it, Janet.

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  7. Raised in the Mohawk Valley, N.Y. with Palatine ancestors going back to 1712, and an area steeped in colonial history as part of our every day lives, I couldn't help but make it part of my writing too.

    Though we may wander (as I did when we moved to western N.Y.)I think we feel secure and enjoy coming back to familiar settings & history, even if it's only through stories.

    I wonder when we're doing research, whether we're actually going back to that time (18th century) or reminiscing about US (in our childhood) going back to a "familiar" time? Like recalling when I'd read "Drums Along the Mohawk" and "Last of the Mohicans" as a child. Or watching "Johnny Tremain", and "Treasure Island". And every once in awhile, they come out with greats like "John Adams".

    I've read great contemporary stories too; but it seems like I can just step out the door and experience the same thing. With historicals, (especially early American), I can somehow experience the familiar, but MORE--and appreciate what was done for me.

    O.K....talk about going too deep!

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    1. Great insights here, Pat. The nostalgia of our own experiences surely enhances our reading historicals. Thanks for sharing!

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  8. Here's my political response. :) With things the way they are today, going back to the beginning of our country--when they got it so right--really appeals. And it gives hope that things could change in the future too.

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    1. I thoroughly agree, Sally. I do think that lends to the appeal of Colonial American fiction. And what the colonials did to fight for the rights of our freedoms does indeed offer us hope for today.

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  9. I loved the Newbery winner A GATHERING OF DAYS and the Newbery Honor THE WITCH OF BLACKBIRD POND. Gotta get those kidlit titles in!

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    1. I hadn't heard of A Gathering of Days. Thanks for mentioning it. And it seems like The Witch of Blackbird Pond is a favorite of many.

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  10. Reading about the past is a great way to escape the stress of the present. People seemed to be stronger and cared more about 'everything' in those days.
    You don't need to enter me in the contest.

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    1. Thanks, Debbie. So true. Simpler times. Passion for family, faith, and freedom!

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  11. Ever since I can remember I have loved the colonial era. I have ancestors that fought in the American Revolution, so I was raised to cherish that part of our country's history. I enjoy the culture, the way of life--and I appreciate the sacrifices people made. Honestly, I didn't know this subgenre existed until last year and when I found it I was thrilled!!
    I would love to be entered. You can contact me at historicalchristianreview{at}gmail{dot}com. Thank you for all your fabulous posts and God Bless!

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  12. I have read some through the years that I got from used bookstores and garage sales, but can't remember the names anymore. But I love reading about that era. The pioneer days also have made me want to read the books of past eras. I would love to win Carla's book. Have tried several times.
    Maxie ( mac262@me.com )

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    1. Thanks, Maxie! I love sorting through books at used bookstores and garage sales! Sometimes that's were the best treasure is discovered.

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  13. To be honest, I haven't read many books from the Colonial days, except children/teen books as I teach my kids American History. I would love to read more books from that era. (I hope I win!) My favorite childhood memories are of the days we lived in Massachusetts and visited Colonial villages. kimberlya(dot)vogel(at)gmail(dot)com

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    1. Me, too, Kimberly. I grew up in Massachusetts and loved visiting all of the colonial sites!

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    2. Carla and Kimberly, where did you grow up? I grew up in Arlington, but my ancestors were from the Williamsburg/Springfield area.

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  14. i enjoy reading novels from this period...life was simpler..and the people were very hard working. love to visit colonial williamsburg when i get the chance

    karenk
    kmkuka at yahoo dot com

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  15. My intense interest was sparked by my mother. In researching our family tree for DAR membership, she came across a Quaker ancestress whose husband and two sons were read out of meeting for their participation in the Patriot cause during the American Revolution. I always wanted to be a fly on the wall in that household to eavesdrop on the conversations between husband and wife in that circumstance.

    Since I can't do that, I can do the research and put together what might have happened. Enter my current work in progress ANDREW'S FORGE. That's a working title and may change completely.

    Research would be easier if I lived near Philadelphia instead of central Kansas, but there's always the internet.

    Moreover, there are all these books written in that era which allow me to see from other perspectives and piggyback on some of these lovely ladies' research. And they have been generous with sharing.

    It was a real God-send to find Colonial Quills. Thank you all.

    jrlight620 at yahoo dot com

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    1. So glad you found us, Judith. You certainly have a great foundation for a story there. Love the name of your WIP. Do come back!

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  16. So many of you are descendants of Patriots...(gulp). My ancestor was a British redcoat but please don't aim your cyber muskets at me! ;-) He did marry a descendant of Mayflower passengers (John Alden & Priscilla Mullins) so hopefully that bloodline will redeem me in everyone's eyes! LOL! I've loved colonial American history since living in in Massachusetts and visiting the historical sites. I read everything I could find about life back in the day, but I never dreamed I'd one day be writing novels set in the era. It feels like I am right at home when immersed in my manuscripts.

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    1. Cyber muskets! Lol! You are redeemed, my friend.

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  17. This is a fascinating era in the early formation of our country. Isn't it funny, when I was a child, it was a chore to read history and government - and seemed so boorrri-n-g. Not now, I enjoy it so much and have the added advantage of still learning at my age. I admire all of you talented writers who take it upon yourselves to write fiction around truth - that's what makes it so captivating to be a history buff.

    Merry Christmas,
    Barb Shelton
    barbjan10@ tx dot rr dot com

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    1. Thank you so much, Barb. I know what you mean. I've always loved history, but didn't always love learning about it as a kid. Now I can't get enough of it and enjoy researching for writing. So many fabulous authors bring it to life!

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  18. I've love the Colonial Period, since I was about 12, when I moved, temporarily, to Newport News, VA. I went with my family to visit so many historic places, including Colonial Williamsburg. It was like magically being transported back in time. After that first visit, anytime I read a book set in Colonial times, I was able to easily put myself more realistically into the story.
    may_dayzee at yahoo dot com

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    1. I was blessed to visit Colonial Williamsburg, as many of our Colonial Quills contributors have been, and like you! The experience so enriched my imagination for writing and reading colonials. I adore living history museums and am so grateful for them.

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  19. I am a history buff. I am fascinated with the Colonial history in the 13 American colonies. I was born in Boston and raised in Canton. Boston, Lexington & Concord are rich in history during the Revolutionary War. Others like Philly, New York City, and Williamsburg are rich in history too. Lots of places to visit. I learned in school where they taught us how to fight for our independence from England. Benjamin Franklin was a major role to shape America that he involved in many activities..I have noticed many historic buildings made out of brick during the Colonial era. Living in the past helps me to understand how they fought for our independence. I would love to win this book.
    JKTerrazas09@aol.com

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    1. Your comments just swept me away to my own childhood. I grew up in the nearby town of Wrentham, and my husband Norfolk (he was also born in Boston). I soaked in all of that great history as a child and am thankful for the opportunity. Yes, there is quite a bit of brickwork in colonial architecture, some of the patterns quite interesting.

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  20. I did watch the John Adsms mini series and also read Johnny Tremain. Betsy Ross in Philly where she made the flag. Along the eastern coast they have many ports where they had trades. I love visiting many historic places. Paul Revere and the lanterns at the Old North Church. It Is fun to learn about the famous people during the Colonial era how they shaped America.
    JKTerrazas09@aol.com

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    1. Indeed! So many wonderful people during that period helped shape our country.

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  21. Philly stole Benjamin Franklin from Boston. He was born in Bodton and fled to Philly to work as an apprentice. Philly is associated with Ben Franklin. Interesting !!!!
    JKTerrazas09@aol.com

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    1. Yes, I'm afraid so. And when I moved to Maine I found a Massachusetts hero that had a bad reputation, non-other than Paul Revere.

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  22. I lived in New Hampshire for a time and visited Boston, and was on the USS Constitution ~ stirring, I will never forget it. I worked in the Nashua Courthouse and recorded handwritten deeds onto a keyed machine (I do not remember the name of) sort of like a court reporter would use. It was fascinating. Reading Johnny Tremain as a youth ~*~ and then most recently working in a middle school with my very own colonial history class of special needs students ~ so absolutely cool. We found a table with chairs and a bulletin board on one side and a chalkboard on the other, that others knew as the "conference room" behind the counselors' offices. It was our special place fourth hour of the day! Instead of the lengthy oration and memory, these students drew pictures with the vocabulary word on the bottom that they drew about. They were able to stand in front of the main class and tell about their picture without notes. It was so wonderfully fabulous!! Kathleen
    lanehillhouse[at]centurylink[dot]net

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    1. That is such a great way to teach those children vocabulary. My mother has taught special needs children and I'm going to tell her how your students learned colonial history. That sounds like an interesting job you had in NH. I adore New England with all its rich colonial history.

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  23. you must bear in mind that I come from a generation that adored Davy Crockett but in Liverpool there were no bears to kill or raccoon skin hats. We did play cowboys and Indians in gasmasks and helmets - debris on a railway embankment near our house. Davy Crocket led me on to Fenimore Cooper, and I've just finished reading a rather fine novel - Arundel - by Kenneth Roberts. Like Cooper, dated but evocative

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    1. Thanks for sharing your experiences, Mike. Apparently the spirit of adventure holds no restrictions on circumstance. I haven't yet read Arundel, but the town is in my state of Maine. Benedict Arnold passed through our county and we have one of the oldest standing forts (Halifax) in the US where he and his troops stayed on the way to Quebec. Thank you for stopping by.

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    2. Benedict Arnold is a character in the book. It's theme is the American seige of Quebec during the war of Independence. Being from Maine, you'd recognise the geographical detail which Kenneth Roberts is big on.

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  24. I don't have a special book that is dear to me but I had a history teacher in elementary school that made me love American history. He wrote his own textbooks, has special units on different people and periods.

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  25. I will almost anything...but I hate to admit it, but I enjoyed reading my daughter's American Girl Books.

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