Tea Party winners: Elaine Marie Cooper's novel goes to both Ashley Penn and Mary Ann Hake:, Carrie Fancett Pagels' and Gina Welborn's Blue Ribbon Brides collection goes to: Melanie Backus Carrie's O' Little Christmas Town Collection goes to: Cherrilynn Bisbano

Monday, October 15, 2012

Red Griffin Inn Tea Party for Carla Olson Gade


Colonial Courtships

Carla Olson Gade is the author of Carving a Future, featured in Colonial CourtshipsPublished by: Barbour Books, October 1, 2012. Carla is also the author of The Shadow Catcher’s Daughter.  Her website is http://carlagade.com



Nathaniel's mother operates the Red Griffin Inn, the family's home, in Carla's novella.  Constance stays with the family and assumes work as an indentured servant after being kidnapped in London.

We are celebrating Carla's release with a Tea Party right here at the Red Griffin Inn! To see more of the inn, go to this post at Romancing America! (click here)


Welcome to our Tea Party for Carla Olson Gade.  Carrie Fancett Pagels is your morning hostess, serving food to break your fasts and Rebecca DeMarino for the afternoon with luncheon fare for you to sup on! On the menu is authentic Muster Day Gingerbread, a recipe found in Carla's novella.


Colonial Courtships -

Set during the years 1753-1762, Colonial  Courtships features the four Ingersoll brothers who reside in Glassenbury with their widowed mother at their family hostelry, The Red Griffin Inn.  Will the unexpected end in four courtships?

Carving a Future - Connecticut, 1752:  Ship figurehead carver Nathaniel Ingersoll has apprenticed for many years under his Uncle Phineas and hopes to become a master ship carver in his own right. Constance Starling was spirited away from England to the Connecticut coast as an indentured servant, arriving too ill for anyone to accept her. When Nathaniel takes pity on her, he purchases her contract. Has he jeopardized the future he has worked so hard to achieve for the welfare of a weakly servant?

See Carrie's review of Carving a Future.

Giveaway:  Carla is offering a colonial gift basket with a signed paperback copy of Colonial Courtships to one fortunate winner! (The winner may opt for an ebook copy from Carrie. International winners will receive an ebook copy in lieu of the gift basket.)  We also have a lovely tea cup, saucer, strainer and cover set that will go out to one of our Tea Party visitors--this winner will be selected from those respondents who come "in character" and contribute to the colonial atmosphere!

Colonial gift basket included Colonial Courtships,
gingerbread scented taper candles, wood spoon,
fall napkins, and gingerbread cookies.


Conversation starter:  Carla would like to know about your character's vocations. Or about an interesting trade in your family history.

You can also find Carla this week at Barbour's Romancing America blog.




140 comments:

  1. Welcome, all! I'll be filling in as hostess this morning until others are up and about and back at their desks.

    I just poured myself a cup of coffee, which will pair oh-so-well with that gingerbread. Please do pull up a seat and join me!

    As for interesting character vocations . . . thus far my published characters have had rather standard ones like planters, merchantmen, and professors of chemistry and philosophy.

    But in my family, I discovered a clock maker!

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    1. Ro, thanks so much! I can't have coffee but will have tea in a bit. This should be a great party and I will pop in and out today, too, after taking a trip in my "carriage" into ye olde Newport News today and then back to the countryside in York.

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    2. Thank you for hosting this celebration for me at Colonial Quills! It truly means the world to me. Roseanna, you make a fine hostess and Carrie, you are always so gracious.

      A clock maker in the family! I find that such an interesting trade, although, since I tend to be late I am sure I've no clockmakers in my family tree!

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    3. Ironically, it's a Higson who was a clockmaker, and the Higson side of the family that is ALWAYS late!

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    4. A good morning to you ladies! Another tea party! What fun! Thank you, ever so much, for the invitation. Oh dear, where are my manners, let me introduce myself. I am Chaplain Debbie Mitchell. Hello, my friend, Carrie, so nice to see you here. My husband could not join me this time, for he is busy with his own doings. I would so enjoy some of that coffee, Roseanna, it smells divine. And the gingerbread looks yummy as well. I do hope that there will be a lot of interesting visitors today. The Red Griffin Inn is so beautiful; I must take a look around....Oh, I do not know anything of my family history. My father, among other trades, was a trapper; mostly muskrat...I shutter just from remembering the sights and smells....I really need that coffee and gingerbread now. Please do excuse me.............

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    5. LOL, Roseanna, I think that is how it often works out!

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    6. Chaplain Debbie, We are so glad you came by today. Yes, the gingerbread and coffee sounds good about now, you may partake a little extra for me after sharing that about your father's trapping escapades. Actually, we authors love to get insights into the senses involved in peoples experiences. Good fodder for authentic story writing.

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  2. Hello Carla! I've never heard of the Red Griffin Inn, but the pic above makes me want to visit!

    Farmers abound in my family history. Genealogy is a passion of my mine. The more interesting trades would be a shoemaker; we have many a blacksmith; and a cooper--a barrel maker; and there was an ancestor with a hemp mill also and my mother discovered the hemp mill stone still stands on the family farm.

    Great questions. Can't wait to stop by and hear everyone else's answers!

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    1. What fun, Anne! I have a family of farmers as well, but we haven't discovered anything as interesting as a hemp mill stone on the property!

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    2. I agree with Roseanna, it is so interesting to have that relic mill stone on the property as a reminder to the past. I am fascinated with genealogy as well. In fact, the Ingersoll family name in Colonial Courtships comes directly from my family tree of New England Ingersolls. The name Red Griffin Inn is a nod to the family crest.

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    3. Hi Anne, are you talking about the hemp millstone at the Hans Herr House Museum? Which of your ancestors owned the hemp mill?

      There are also 5 hempstones at the Landis Valley Museum and one of our Lancaster County hempstones went to the Mercer Museum in Doylestown. Two Lancaster County hempstones went to the Flower Dew 100 museum in Virginia. I found about 20 more in private collections all throughout Lancaster County with a few of them in Cumberland, York and Adams counties.

      Between the years of 1720 and 1870 there were over 100 water-powered mills for processing hemp fiber in Lancaster County alone and dozens more hemp mills in all of the surrounding counties.

      I have tons more information. I wrote a book called Hempstone Heritage, about the Pennsylvania hemp industry. If you have any more info or want more info email me at Lesstark@ptd.net.

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  3. I am dropping in from the future because the aroma of that gingerbread drew me back about 90 years! (I should have a character fleshed out to make her appearance quite soon!)

    On a trip along the seashore towns in Mass and Maine last year I often stopped the vehicle to take a 'drive by' photo of buildings just like the Red Griffin. It is SO lovely and what says colonial New England better than these type of buildings.

    I'm going to duck back out before all the colonials arrive as I will shock them in my knit pajamas!
    We have been celebrating for a week over at the Inkwell, so I am learning a lot about the Ingersoll men.

    Congratulations Carla! I can't wait to read this book

    Enjoy the Tea Party, ladies!

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    1. I love the colonial east coast. So many beautiful 18th century homes! The Red Griffin Inn featured in Colonial Courtships is one of the house museums of the Historical Society of Glastonbury, Connecticut, where the book takes place. This town has more house built earlier than 1800 than all but one town in the US. It was so much fun visiting there and seeing the homes of some of the true life characters in my book: a shipbuilder, doctor, tavern keeper, and more!

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    2. I must make a point of visiting there. I have lived in NY state all my life and have never been to Connecticut. I hope to at least go to Mystic Seaport, and now, Glastonbury!

      Thanks Carla. Congratulations!

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  4. I'm so looking forward to this collection of novella's, yours most of all Carla. I truly enjoyed The Shadow Catcher's Daughter. Virtual gingerbread is the only sort I can enjoy now, so yes, I'll have some.

    In my debut novel set in 1784, one character is a naturalist and a physician, another is a bounty hunter, another a subsistence farmer. There's a miller, a trade store proprietor, a smith, a planter, and somewhere among them all a British army deserter.

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    1. Thank you so much, Lori! I dare say you'll like this one even more because of the time period we both enjoy so much! I thought you'd like that gingerbread, a baker as you are, but sorry you cannot partake. I guess you'll have to fill your home with scents like those from candles, like the ones I've included in the gift basket.

      What interesting vocations for your characters indeed!

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  5. I'd love a cup of tea and a slice of the gingerbread. I have a moment to rest before my employer needs me. The wax won't be ready for a bit. You can't rush the wax, you know, or the candles won't form to suit.

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    1. Oh, lovely! Perhaps it's some of your candles that have made their way into Carla's gift basket. =)

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    2. If they are straight and true, they were probably made by my employer. She is a master at the craft. Alas, I am sorry to say my own attempts still produce candles most often sold to the lesser households. My mind wanders a bit in the dipping process, you see, and if one isn't precise in one's movements, the new wax may melt off the old. 'Tis an exacting craft.

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    3. PEGG, I bought beeswax candles from CW because I wanted to see if they really did burn so much brighter than the regular candles. I got to watch them dip candles at Yorktown Settlement about eight years ago at Christmastime. Neat but yes, you have to pay attention!

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  6. Hello, Peg the Chandler! So nice of you to come by to help celebrate. Enjoy the tea and gingerbread. We've posted the original recipe, as also found in Colonial Courtships.

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    1. The gingerbread was most fine! I have read through the recipe (yes! I can read) and it reminds me of one handed down by my grandmother on my father's side. She was fond of pouring a lemon sauce over it, warm, before serving.

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  7. Congratulations, Carla! I can't wait to read your story. :) Wishing you great success! And yes, I'd love a cup of tea. Just the thing for a lovely autumn day.

    My main character is a schoolteacher in Colonial Pennsylvania, though not for long. Her skills will come in handy, though, for her new vocation which I cannot divulge at this time. (I am co-authoring the WIP, and we have a ways to go.) But you are most welcome to guess!

    Happy reading and writing!

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    1. Thanks for coming by, Karen, and for your good thoughts and enthusiasm about my writing! I love hearing sneak peaks about your WIP, and I think I'm guessing whom your co-author is!

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  8. Wow this basket and a good cup of tea would be awesome.

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    1. Here is your tea, madame, and help yourself to the lemon, honey, cream, or even some of the white sugar we secured for the event.

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    2. I am having ginger tea myself, with honey and the goods that the apothecary gave me in ye olde yorktown.

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  9. Good morning all! I'd love a cup of coffee and some of that gingerbread cake! I traveled all the way from Charleston and I'm absolutely famished! Congratulations Carla, on your new release! The cover is absolutely my favorite of all the covers in the series and I can't wait to read it! What a lovely party! I do believe I'll stay awhile and mingle with all the interesting ladies. My father was a fisherman and a farmer and I have taken the trade of an apothecary, though not professionally. I assist a doctor by prescribing herbs when necessary.
    In my novels, my characters' professions are quite varied! From pirates (yes, that is a trade!) to privateers, naval officers, soap makers, farmers, ship merchants, parsons, surgeons, and constables.
    I'm so happy to be here. Oh, dear, thank you for the cake. It is divine. Adalia Winston (aka MaryLu Tyndall)

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    1. So good to see you again, Adalia! And how very kind of you to travel so far to join us! Here is your coffee and gingerbread cake.

      I do love picking up the little tidbits you share about herbal medicines. And your pirating friends have always provided such adventurous tales!

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    2. Adalia, so good to see you! Isn't this Inn just divine! I really haven't had a chance to take it all in, but I do intend to do so. Our hostesses have done a wonderful job preparing for this party, don't you agree? Jack could not make it to this party, he is busy with what-nots and all. Do try the coffee and gingerbread, they are both delicious. In fact, I believe I will have a second cup. (Okay, now I really want some coffee. I believe I will pour myself an actual cup.)
      Well, Dear Adalia, I must go about mingling. Would you care to join me?

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    3. So kind of you to visit with us Miss Winston! 'Tis a talent for sure that you have as an apothecary! It is so good to see such strong story heroines. I've read a few by MaryLu that are even a good match for those pirates! Indeed!

      Thank you for your gracious comments!!

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    4. Why, thank you, Roseanne, for such a warm welcome! And Chaplain Debbie, I do believe I will join you in mingling! What a fascinating group of people. I should like to get to know everyone!
      Match for pirates, you say Carla? Of course.. what lady worth her salts would not be able to take on a pirate or two.. or perhaps even a rich plantation owner's son. ;-)

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  10. Good day, ladies! What a delight to join your tea party inside this lovely inn. Mrs. Lorena Talvis here. Gingerbread is a favorite of my dear husband's and something I love to bake myself. This one looks quite delicious and I would love to sample a slice with a cup of tea. Very best wishes and good success with your new release, Carla! As to your question, there are shipbuilders, sea captains and merchants in my family, and you might find it interesting to know we have a neighbor here in Duxboro who had some bad luck with his own attempt at the trade of figurehead carving and is now the lightkeeper on our bay.

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    1. Mrs. Talvis, so kind of you to visit! I'm glad to hear that you and your husband enjoy Gingerbread so; such a New England favorite!

      Thank you, Lisa, for the congratulations. And I am so curious about the figurehead carver turned lightkeeper!

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  11. Good morn, all! What a pleasure to visit with such a delightful assembly in this lovely inn! The setting is amazing, and the gingerbread smells delectable. I believe I'll have a slice along with a cup of tea with honey. What a perfect way to start a cool and cloudy fall day. Carla, your novella sounds entirely intriguing, and I must add it to my to-be-read list! Congratulations on this release!

    As you may know, I'm a trained doctor, an usual profession for a woman in this day. I had the advantage of a father who was a doctor, and as he had no sons, he trained me to assist him. But I'm also serving as a spy, courier, and smuggler for the Sons of Liberty during our lamentable war with England. My story includes characters of many trades and professions, but mainly the military ones of soldier and sailor, along with Indian guides and warriors, and also doctors, lawyers, politicians, housewives, servants, assorted tradesmen, and what we call mechanics, such as Paul Revere. 'Tis a varied cast, indeed!

    I must say, this gingerbread is the best I've tasted. Thank you so much for posting the receipt. I'll make sure my housekeeper, Sarah, serves it often.

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    1. Good day, my friend! So kind of you to visit here with us at The Red Griffin. Your cast of characters is so interesting, indeed. Colonial days seem like such a simpler time in so many ways, but it was filled with such hard working folk including your doctor/spy!.

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  12. all in your lovely basket would be welcome into my home, would have tea as i read your novel to my husband...

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    1. That sounds delightful, Juanita! I read a wee bit of Colonial Courtships to my own husband last night and he enjoyed it so!

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  13. Good morning all, and thank you for the gingerbread. It brings me fond memories of my mother's. A dollop of whip cream on top is a lovely touch.

    Farmers, for the most part, make up my family's history. However, we do have one Copithorne (my mother's side) who was a buccaneer, and either him or another Copithorne delivered supplies for George Washington.

    On my husband's side, the Squires were truly country Squires, though one was a sea captain who created the signal flag system still used today. That same captain also charted the Baltic Sea (I'm not a 100% sure if this was the sea or if it was another...bad memory, you know).

    When my husband's great, great grandfather's father wanted him to be a lawyer. In those days, the father determined what the son would be. However, the son wanted to be a farmer. His father, thinking that time in Canada would change that notion, sent the son and gave him an ultimatum to succeed. The son did and now the Squire House and farm site is considered an historical site (still called the Squire House). The house is absolutely gorgeous, modeled after a manor in England.

    The Burger's (my father's side of the family) came to Pennsylvania as indentured servants to escape persecution from the Lutheran Church in Switzerland. They were Brethren (otherwise known as the Dunkards) who were very similar to Mennonites. My great grandfather traveled from Ohio to California establishing farms. He then sent his son up to Alberta to find land. Then a group of the Dunkards moved to Arrowwood, Alberta. When I was a very young child, we still attended the Brethren Church.

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    1. I love reading all your history, Lynn!!! Did you know that Suzanne Woods Fisher grew up with the Dunkards? I think that inspired her Amish fiction. Where is the Squire house at, Lynn? How wonderful you have all that information. Lot of vocations there, too!

      Tea with your gingerbread? I imagine Mistress Roseanna is feeding her young ones. We're expecting our lovely next hostess, Rebecca, shortly!

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    2. What a fun history! Thanks so much for sharing, Mistress Squire! And could I offer you tea or coffee to go with your gingerbread?

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    3. Tea would be nice, thank you. With a bit of honey and cream, if you please.

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    4. Carrie,

      The Squire House is west of Owen Sound, Ontario.

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    5. Dear Lynn, How I enjoy hearing more about your family history. I know you enjoy researching it, as I do mine. In my Colonial Courtships novella (Carving a Future) you will see that Nathaniel breaks the mold of the eldest son following in the father's vocation. 'Tis some unique circumstances that makes this allowable, and he follows his uncle's trade as a figurehead carver. The second eldest is the one who ends up following the late father's vocation of a merchant ship captain.

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    6. Carla, I look forward to reading it. I love the name Nathaniel! Going now to look for e-book edition.

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  14. AWESOME PLEASE enter me! I absolutely LOVE Romancing America novels and I have been trying to get my hands on this one for a while now!

    Amada (pronounced: a.m.a.th.a) Chavez

    amada_chavez{AT}yahoo[DOT]com

    Acts 16:31

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    1. Amada, so glad to have visit us. And nice to hear how much you enjoy the Romancing America novels. I enjoy them, too! They have a nice website that features each of the books at http://romancingamerica.com (I'm featured there this week so perhaps you might stop by.)

      Blessings!

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  15. I must say I am quite partial to the wonderful gingerbread cookies baked in the Raleigh Tavern Bakery in Williamsburg. And a good Sally Lunn bread. Both served with tea...divine!

    Lauralee "Rose"


    blissful63(at)gmail(dot)com

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    1. Lauralee, I have my Grandmother Horton's recipe for ginger cookies and so in my novel, I just had to make ginger cookies my mc's specialty! They would have been called biscuits (biskits) or cake in his day! I bake them every Christmas now, just like my grandmother and my mother did!

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    2. So nice to see you here, Lauralee. With all of this talk of gingerbread cookies and cakes today I think I must do some baking this evening. Gingerbread, of course!

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  16. Good afternoon to you! I'm so glad to join you and the ginger cake looks delicious! I come laden with some breads I've just brought out of my oven - a manchet, a brown loaf and a cornbread that I've added some currents to. Cheeses, some cold slices of ham and mutton, with pots of jam and crocks of butter round out our afternoon fare. A cup lemonbalm tea with a bit of sugar will hit the spot for me.

    Carla, so happy to be celebrating the release of CARVING A FUTURE from COLONIAL COURTSHIPS! I love that the Ingersolls are a part of your heritage and the significance of The Red Griffin Inn!

    Anne and Lynn, farmers are my heritage, too, from my mother's side of our family. My main character is based on my nineth great-grandfather and he was from landed gentry with a mill in a tiny hamlet north of London. He appears to have been the eldest, and somehow disinherited, and his occupation was a baker. His brother, a shipmaster, brought the little family over the pond, and eventually the settled on Long Island in 1640. It is much fun to add the fiction surrounding those few facts!

    So, let me settle back and enjoy your ocmpany! May I pour you a cup of tea, or is coffee to your liking! Welcome and thank you for dropping by!

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    1. I am enjoying my ginger tea with honey, still, but would love a slice of the manchet, please! What an unusual name--sounds French. And I will have a little of all your other goodies (since they are virtual!) as they sound quite tasty! You are such a lovely hostess.

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    2. So kind of you, Rebecca, to contribute such fine fare for the festivities! I enjoyed reading about your 9th great-grandfather. Don't you just wish you knew more? I have a 9th great-grandmother whom I wish I knew much more about and plan to write about her one day. Fiction will have to do to fill in the gaps! How fun!

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  17. Hello ladies, sorry to arrive late. The wheels of the equipage needed tending to. I would love some tea with lemon along with that delicious looking gingerbread. I come from a long line of naval officers,farmers and engineers. The Red Griffin Inn looks like it would be a charming setting. Congratulations on your new release, Carla. The cover is enchanting.

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    1. Welcome, Janet! Enjoy!

      My dad and my hubby are retired naval officers, though their habit of landing aircraft on a ship would be only in the dreams of Leonardo I imagine!

      Loving The Red Griffin Inn! Hope you can stay awhile!

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    2. Greetings, Janet! "The wheels of the equipage", love that! Thank you for your congratulations and compliment on the cover. I was very pleased with the cover and glad they used the model that I picked. I love getting involved in the cover design. You have quite a heritage with your family's occupations!

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  18. Tea parties are so much fun! I enjoy reading all of your replies...in my family we have a cheese and salami maker on one side and on the other side, they worked in a department store and for Ford cars in the early 1900's. Before that, I am uncertain of their industries! I should find out!

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    1. Hello, Martha! Glad you came by. I agree with you, it is fun to read all of these comments. A cheese & salami maker, oh, my! Getting hungry just hearing about it! Looking into the vocations of our ancestors is lots of fun. I've found quite a few interesting. I have everything from clergy to constables, blacksmiths to barmaids, mariners to midwives, servants to shipbuilders, plowmen to poets. Actually quite a few authors, and I'm glad to carry on the tradition!

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  19. Good afternoon Ladies!

    Popping up again Carla, for the drawing of Colonial Courtships... also brought a batch of butterscotch bars (say that fast! :) to add to the festivities. And no, I have not been imbibing on the rum that went into them!

    However the scent of the gingerbread is heavenly! It's inspired me to get out the candles for autumn ambiance. Hm-m-m, think I will sidle over to the table and have a cup of my favorite mint tea to warm me as the trip north was rather damp today.

    Love the Red Griffin Inn! We have a shop in my area that sells colonial & primitive furniture & decor. Like the Red Griffin, I would just want to live there...:)

    Much success on your writing, Carla-- and Blessings!

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    1. Hello, Martha and Pat!Indeed, tea parties are so much fun! Butterscotch bars! Mmmmm!

      And I love fall, too. Filled with warm colors and scents!

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    2. Thank you so much, Pat, for your presence here at the tea party, good thoughts on my writing, and for bringing along those butterscotch bars (glad to hear you are abstaining from the rum!). That shop you spoke of sounds delightful. I love going into them, the scents immediately sweep you away. We have a nice one in Casco, Maine called The Bittersweet Barn that I adore. And yes, every time I visit an old colonial home I dream of living there, too. At least, what it was like to live there.

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    3. Pat, so good to see you again! I could smell those butterscotch bars from across the room. I just had to find out where the wonderful smell was coming from. What a wonderful surprise to find that you were carrying them. Isn't this a lovely Inn? And our hostesses have been so great.

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  20. Thank you for the opportunity to win this book! It sounds lovely.

    As for coming in character, I am afraid my characters are from the modern times. I guess they cannot join in then.

    Thanks again!

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    1. Oh, of course you can, 4readin. Our colonial characters love to hear about the future and what vocations have endured, or something new perhaps. Thank you for coming by today!

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    2. Oh if our ancestors could but travel through time! Would they be amazed or befuddled? Would love to hear about your modern day characters! So glad you stopped by ~ be sure to enjoy a cup of tea! Good luck with the drawing ~ I read Carla's novella and loved it!

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  21. Carla, one of my earliest American ancestors was Shadrach or Sydrack or other variants of the name and last name Williams. His brother was Roger Williams of Rhode Island. Shadrach was a business man right here where I now live!!! And here is something really cool--there was a dispute that Shadrach Williams ever came to America because there is a Shadrach buried in England, reportedly. But I was in the genealogy section of my little Yorktown library. And documented in one book was a legal transaction with Shadrach Williams and a business partner. How cool is that! Early 1600's.

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    1. Carrie - that is very cool! Mayhap my Hortons knew your Williams! They spent 2 years in Massachusetts and purchased land in New Haven before landing on Long Island around 1639ish. It was a small new world!

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    2. How cool is that! I wonder if he was as assertive as Roger Williams? Interesting that he didn't join his brother in Rhode Island.

      And Rebecca, I recognize the Horton name from my own research in Massachusetts in the 1600's. Interesting connections.

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    3. Carrie, I just love getting to the bottom of a good mystery! That is awesome that you discovered that documentation about Shadrach Williams. Town libraries are an awesome resource and highly underused. I wonder if Shadrach had the same religious ideals as his brother, Roger Williams who started the first Baptist church in America. Thanks for sharing that cool tidbit of your family history.

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    4. Lynn! I didn't see your reply before I posted mine. 'Tis no surprise to me that you were also interested is Shadrach's religious leanings.

      Rebecca,I have a great many New England early settlers in my family, too. The list is long, but it was a small world then and so many of us may share common ancestors and acquaintances.

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    5. My great(9 times) grandfather, Barnabas Horton was one of the founders of Southold, L.I., while his brother, Thomas, settled in Springfield MA in the 1600's. I love coming out to New England to research. So beautiful and rich with history!

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    6. This Shadrach apparently came over with the London bunch that set up shoppe in Jamestowne and Yorktown. I don't think he ever was up in Massachusetts. And it is altogether possible that this Shadrach was not Roger's brother hence why this Shadrach conducted business here during the same time frame, married, and had children whereas they are saying there is a Shadrach buried in England. But the arguers contended that Shadrach never came here. No documentation of a Shadrach in VA but there is. Maybe Roger's brother never came here. Maybe my businsessman Shadrach wasn't his brother.

      Lynn, When I read about Roger I thought wow, that sure sounds like a lot of the Williams side of my family! Assertive is one word for it, lol!

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    7. That is very intriguing, Carrie! I know from the little bit of ancestral research my daughter did that we had a lot of repeated names within families.

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  22. I'm blessed beyond measure to see everyone here helping me celebrate the release of Colonial Courtships! Rebecca, Roseanna, and Carrie you all are fine hostesses, thank you so much!

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    1. Carla, it's been such and honor and sooo much fun to meet everyone here and share about your book! I enjoyed it very much!! I look forward to reading more from you!

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  23. This isn't fair...I feel like I'm playing, when I'm really promoting my new book. Love to you all for joining us here!!!

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    1. It has been a pleasure, dear Carla. These tea parties are always so much fun and you meet the most interesting characters around. Your book sounds wonderful and I would so love to win it. Now, let us continue to play, shall we?

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  24. Hello everyone. I am Wyatt Scott from Scott's Hundred. And this party is is absolutely fabulous. Can someone tell me where the cookies are?



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    1. Oh, Wyatt, we have some scrumptious butterscotch bars you must try! So happy to have you here! Welcome!

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    2. BTW -is that Scott's Hundred as in Civil War calvary?

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    3. Honored to have you here, Mr. Scott! You shall find the cookies on the sideboard, near the great hearth.

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    4. Good day, Mr. Scott, it is a pleasure to make your acquaintance. If you are wishing to partake of Pat's wonderful butterscotch bars, you best be quick about it. I fear I may eat more than my share if someone doesn't step in and save me from myself. Do have a wonderful time!

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    5. Oh, CHAPLAIN DEBBIE, good to see you here and you've met my very close relation, a descendant of Thomas Wyatt, hence his name. He does so enjoy these parties. Sadly his mother left England after her father's death in the tower. She married into the Scott family. I daren't say what I believe happened to his parents--tis tragic.

      Mistress GADE, I feel sure young master Scott has partaken of a great many this eve.

      Mistress DeMarino, I have not heard anything of the kind. But you know--we Williamses left England partly because of our great civil war with Cromwell being a great friend of ours. But we didn't want to get caught up in all that. I believe the Wyatts and Scotts may have been involved in that Civil war but that was quite a long time ago and my memory fails me!

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  25. Ooooh, I love tea parties. You ladies are just so creative. I can see why you are all wonderful authors. I would love to be entered to win the gift basket and signed book!

    emmamalissa(at)gmail(dot)com

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    1. Thanks, Emma! We do have fun here!! So glad you stopped by!

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  26. Wonderful post and pics, dear Carla:) What a beautiful, generous gift basket. Those ginger biscuits look delicious - along with everything else! Pls don't enter me in the drawing as I already own this wonderful book! And my neighbor was eyeing it covetously and has already borrowed it! Bless you all for an uplifting tea party!

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  27. That's is so encouraging to hear, Laura! I hope your neighbor will enjoy Colonial Courtships. Thank you so much for stopping by. You are such a blessing to us all!

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  28. Good morning, come in and let me pour you a nice cup of tea. I am working on finishing the sewing of this lovely dress for the gov'na's daugther. It is cold out so come and sit by the fire and enjoy your tea. I'll stop and have a wee break with ya!
    rhonda_nash_hall@comcast.net

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    1. I'm standing near the sideboard so let me offer you some gingerbread and tea, dear! Honey and ginger for you? Where do you hail from?

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    2. 'Tis a pleasure to have come and sit with us a spell, Rhonda!

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  29. I would really like to read this book and the basket!
    likesmusic2@consolidated.net

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  30. Debbie and Rhonda, so good of you to come by! Yes, do sit by the fire and stay for a spell!

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  31. Good morrow, mum! This gift basket and book look wonderful, though how I will have time to read with all the laundry to be done and food to be cooked is a wonder. My grandfather was a farmer, but alas, we had to sell the land after he passed. shopgirl152nykiki@yahoo.com

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    1. You shall find a moment to read, Veronica! You must sneak the book into your laundry basket, if you must. My grandmother had to sell the farm after my grandfather passed away, too. It is a sad thing to see it go.

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  32. Well, it is getting quite late. I really must be getting home. I had a simply marvelous time. Thank you ever so much for the invitation. And may I ask, is this a one day tea party or will it be continuing? Do let me know, so that I do not miss out on any of the fun. I do hope I win the book and the basket. But, if I do not, I know that the winner will be ever so happy! A good night to you all and God bless......hmmm, maybe I will be taking some of those butterscotch bars with me, for the road? Let me see, are there any left to be had? Or did Mr. Scott eat them all? Oh my, there are so many left, it's like they replenish themselves in some magical way...in any case, I shall grab some and be on my way.

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    1. We appreciate your presence here at the tea party, Chaplain Debbie! You are so correct about those treats magically replenishing themselves!! LOL! We'll call it a day, but you know these tea parties sometimes linger on.

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  33. I figured I'd give you my email in case it's needed for the contest. debsbunch5@jesusanswers.com

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  34. I can smell that gingerbread from here. Having lived in Williamsburg for 7 years long years ago, I love Colonial fiction.
    godblessamerica.jan(at)gmail(dot)com
    It cracks me up writing my email in a post about Colonial America.

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    1. That gave me a little chuckle, too, Jan! Make sure you have a serving of that gingerbread. I love Colonial Williamsburg and had the pleasure of visiting last year. Thank you for stopping by!

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  35. I love gingerbread and tea with it! My family came from a long line of cabinet makers. Much after this time period, they migrated to a river town named Doniphan in Kansas that was supposed to be the next New Orleans. Since you probably have not heard of Doniphan, you will understand that growth there was a disappointment. My family branched out into other trades, as well as, farming.

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    1. tickmenot, we are delighted that you stopped by! What a hearty trade, cabinetmakers. It makes me wonder if there are any pieces that have survived through the years. I'd never heard of Doniphan, it is too bad that it did not meet the anticipated success it had hoped for.

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  36. Hello Ladies. Miss Abigail Iddings here. Sorry for being late to the party. It was dreadful getting here from Pennsylvania. Is there any tea and that delicious gingerbread left me? I would love to have some.
    My so many times great granddaughter, Amy C, would love to read Colonial Courtships.
    campbellamyd at gmail dot com

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    1. ABIGAIL!!! We just love AMY here! So nice to meet you. I have peppermint tea with honey and a nice cherry streudel here this morning. Let me see if I can find some gingerbread for you. If not, Mistress Gade left a recipe you can try at home. Look back through her receipts until about a week ago, one day prior to the Lord's day, I believe! Welcome!

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    2. We are honored, all the way from Pennsylvania! We have a magical endless stash of goodies for you to partake of, Miss Iddings! And as far as your many times great-granddaughter, we are delighted to know how much she wants to read Colonial Courtships. And Mistress Pages is correct, the recipe is in the book and posted her at CQ! Thanks for joining us.

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  37. guess I don't have a unique vocation but my character would probably be a teacher if I was a writer.

    nice giveaway thanks

    ABreading4fun [at] gmail [dot] com

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    1. I am thinking that your character was a man because women were not normally school masters back then. But I feel certain women were teaching all over the place but not in a public way.

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    2. Ah, but apple blossom perhaps could teach at a dame school, or a finishing school. I like that idea! Thanks for dropping by!

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  38. I actually visited the Red Griffin Inn with Phoebe from Lisa Richardson's "Impressed by Love" when I had the pleasure of critiquing it. Food smelled great.

    My newest heroine (coming out next week) is Constance Cavendish. She was the belle of the ball, but when her father died and her family lost their plantation, she found work teaching dance, generally a man's job, but not unladylike.

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  39. Nice to see you here, Dina. Congratulations on your upcoming release! I love your heroine's name of Constance, btw. ;) It is a beautiful name that has endured through the ages. Nice to learn that you were one of Lisa's crit partners. I'm so pleased with her novella, she did a fantastic job with it!

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  40. CARLA!!! LOVE THE COVER, girl!! Looks AMAZING!!

    And did I hear mention of "peppermint tea with honey and a nice cherry streudel"????

    An interesting trade in my family history??? Mmmm ... does being a nun count?? Or quantity?? I had two sisters and an aunt who were nuns and three sisters, three aunts and one mother who were teachers, so overload on the educational types ... :)

    CONGRATS on the release, Carla -- hope you sell a TON!!

    Hugs,
    Julie


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    1. Yes, JULIE we have peppermint tea with honey and gingerbread and streudel. Well there certainly were nuns here. Maryland was a predominantly Catholic state. And of course you could have been up north in New France!

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    2. Thank you, Julie, great to see you here! I was very pleased with the great job they did on the cover. I only wish they could have had my handsome figurehead carver on there too, but readers will have to find out about him inside the story.

      Nuns, now that is an interesting vocation. I have a lot of clergy in my family history all the way from first settlers until today. And teachers, too! My mom was a teacher for 30 years, so I know that is a noble occupation.

      Thanks again for stopping by, and make sure you take some of that strudel home with you...we've a never ending supply.

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  41. Well, I began the day with coffee - really good coffee - this morning. Worked awhile at school and came home tired to the bone. So I made myself a cup of Earl Grey. Wonderful! No ginger cookies with it, though.

    Now about characters in my family background. I don't know that I would characterize them as "characters" except in the sense that they are just folks. My paternal grandfather was raised in an orphanage in Louisana because his mother died while his father was off at the war. At the age of 12 he ran away from the orphanage and joined Wild Bill Hitchocks Wild West Show and travel with him for awhile. He was trying to locate his father. He finally did locate his father who was a shoe cobbler for the army in the area of Southport (near Wilmington, NC) - a coastal area and fortification.

    Later, my grandfather and his father had a shoe repair (cobbler) shop in the port city of Wilmington, NC. It was located at about half level below the sidewalk in the city.

    My grandfather did not learn to read, write, or do math until he married my grandmother and she taught him. He learned enough to be able to read the headlines, figure sums for how much he charged people to fix their shoes, and sign his name.

    Now, please enter me in this delightful tea party giveaway. The books sounds lovely and the ginger cookies - well, yummy!

    godleyv at yahoo[dot]com

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    1. VERA, WOW what stories you could get from that family history! Wild Bill Hickok's show, cool! And learning to read from his wife--I love that story! thanks for sharing with us and for coming by. Gingerbread? Coffee or tea?

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  42. Hi, all. Better late than never. I celebrated my birthday today and just returned from dinner with my husband, so a cup of tea would be appreciated. Carla, I read your part of Colonial Courtships and loved the setting and the characters. I had never read anything about a figurehead carver, so of course being the history nerd that I am, I loved learning something new. Thank you for that and for a good, wellwritten story.
    Lilyan, the main character in my novel is an artist who paints portraits, murals, and wallpaper. It was fascinating studying the history of wallpaper.
    As for unique occupations, my father retired from the Army Airborne Rangers to become the Chief Radiological Officer for South Carolina for what we used to call Civil Defense (Disaster Preparedness and now Homeland Security). It was his responsibility to keep track of all the radio active materials in the state. He used to say that there was so much of it in South Carolina, we should glow in the dark.
    I spoke with someone today whose friend's son majored in "packaging." He designs boxes, crates, and the stuff that goes inside of packages to keep merchandise from getting damaged.
    Would it be rude of me to ask for another cup of tea as well as a footstool to prop up my tired limbs?

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  43. Here you go, more tea...

    Wishing you happy birthday tidings, Susan! I'm delighted that you took time to stop by after your busy day. It sounds like you had an enjoyable evening with your husband.

    Glad to hear that you enjoyed Carving a Future! It was great fun to write and research. As you know, authors are always looking for unusual trades and I hadn't heard much about a figurehead carvers. I really enjoyed learning about it, and writing about it. That is also a fascinating occupation for Lilyan, your own character!

    It amazes me all that it takes to make the world go round. Your father's occupation had so much responsibility! As for the packaging career you mentioned, that actually sounds like fun.

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  44. A trade in my family's history: My maternal grandfather who died before I was born began as a brewer at 15 in Madison, Wisconsin, for someone else's business, and started his own bakery. It was quite successful. My mother died when I was five and I did not see my grandmother again until I was visiting Wisconsin when I was 17. At that time my grandmother was in her 80s. The young couple I visited took me to see her. The woman had been the high school girl who lived in our home during the week and took care of our home and me. Sometimes she would take me home to the country with her to visit her family. Her dad called me "girly" and they had very unsugared lemonade. Puckery!! How important are people the Lord places in our life! Back to the bakery ~ I have a memory of sitting on top of a tall unheated water radiator in the staircase landing between floors where I could look out and see the tall double story fire station across the street and the happenings. In my mid-twenties I moved to Wisconsin and I traveled past the place where there was a different modern fire station and another business in the bakery location. There had been a pastry kitchen the family also owned that was an off-shoot from the main bakery near the university trade. In the civic center expansion, the exclusive clothing company that bought out the bakery, also was absorbed. The finale: A cousin of mine started a bakery with the same name in a neighboring farming community. He only knew how to bake from the original recipe amounts and sold the excess as day-old-bread the next day because he didn't know how to lessen the recipe. My German grandfather's last name actually meant "weaver." That would be interesting to find out the previous occupations!
    Kathleen ~*~ P.S. I like Earl Grey tea and scones!
    lanehillhouse[at]centurylink[dot]net

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  45. We've Earl Grey and scones aplenty! What an interesting history that is, Kathy. And I'm so glad to see how the Lord provided for you in your relationships. Thank you for sharing and for dropping by to join us for the tea party!

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  46. How would a person politely refuse Gingerbread in Colonial times? I mean really...I don't like it and would have trouble schooling my features so y'all didn't know :) Would it have been considered rude to refuse or ask for something different?

    Now, onto the interesting family trade. My great grandfather was a lawyer, turned circuit judge, turned jailer, in central Florida back in the late 1800s to early 1930s. He was a big man, and I mean big as in 6'6" tall, extremely broad shouldered and always wore a huge Stetson, making him appear even larger. My dad says he was quite intimidating. Granddaddy Thaddeus had a reputation and it probably wouldn't be considered a good one. He was known as "the hanging judge". I actually have a picture somewhere of the supposedly last public hanging he attended, officiated, or whatever it is called. Not a pretty sight. Anyway, he always seemed like a larger than life character to me and a little scary, but I would have liked to have known him.

    Tea I love, but do you think I could have a shortbread cookie instead of gingerbread?

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    1. 'Tis a good question, Anne. I believe it is perfectly appropriate to graciously opt for another preference when they are offered. And our sidebar is full of many delicious items in addition to gingerbread, including butterscotch bars, and I do see some shortbread cookies there, too!

      Wow! Your granddaddy does sound like a larger than life character. His powerful presence was certainly needed for his vocation!

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  47. I like this blog very much. It's both entraining and deliciouses. :-) I know there are many takers for the basket and rightfully so. Reguardless I'll look for your book, not only do I enjoy writing but I love reading. Good Luck
    Mary L. Ball
    "Escape to Big Fork Lake"

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  48. Mary, we are so pleased that you came by, we do have much fun here! And you are in good company as so many of your fellow authors here are also crazy for books! We hope to see you back again. Thank you so much for stopping by and for your interest in Colonial Courtships!

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  49. Well, I have returned to see who is still at the party. Looks like quite a few people have graced this Inn with their presence. I do apologize for not dropping by yesterday, but I had a nice visit with my grandson, Lucas. *he's a pirate, you know? but, don't tell anyone* He kept me quite busy, so I was unable to get away and join you all here. I did so miss Pat's delicious butterscotch bars! And I see there is still some here. I do declare, your sidebar never seems to get emptied. I guess I should go get a bar or two, just to be polite. *wink wink* As I was approaching the inn, I couldn't help but notice what a lovely day this is. The air is so crisp and the colors! Oh my, the colors are spectacular! Well, enough of my blabberings, I shall leave you to your other guests.

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    1. A beautiful fall day, indeed! Carving a Future begins in July and ends on a crisp fall morn. Fall, my favorite season of all! So glad you popped back in.

      And we won't say a peep about Lucas' "trade".

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    2. Oh, thank you, dear, it would be a bit of a problem should his 'trade' get about town. He is gone now, so no worries. I am so loving this event! Everyone looks so lovely and seem to be having a marvelous time!

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  50. Tea and gingerbread sounds divine, my dear. What a beautiful job Carrie and the girls do here, and Carla, your feature this week reminds me how much I want to read this novella collection. You and Lisa are enough to draw me in, but Laurie Alice and Amber make it especially exciting! I've heard just a bit about it and now I must go and buy it for my very own!
    all the best on your launch!

    Kathy Maher

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    1. Thank you so much, Kathy! You are such a joy and encouragement!

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  51. Its not an age-old family trade or anything, but both of my grandpas and my uncle make/made their living as taxi drivers for the Amish. Most people find that rather interesting. =-)

    bskaggs(at)zoominternet(dot)net

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    1. I think that is interesting! So what kind of taxi is it, a regular one or a horse and buggy??

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  52. This is a wonderful post and wonderful giveaway....and I love your blog!! I really want to read this book of Novella's...sounds like a really good and fun read.
    Blessings.....Joy
    ibjoy1953[at]yahoo[dot]come

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  53. Joy, I'm glad you came by for the tea party and that you are interested in reading Colonial Courtships!

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  54. I have always been fascinated with Colonial Times. What a wonderful giveaway this is. I love your blog and would love to read this novella.

    Blessings,
    Jo
    azladijo(at)aol(dot)com

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  55. Well, where has the day gone? I suppose I should be getting back home. I do hate to leave, but I do have a husband that expects me home soon. I have enjoyed my visit today and I wish each one of you a pleasant night. May the Lord bless you with wonderful dreams. *Ehem* maybe one more bar for the road? *wink wink* Night all!

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  56. Blessings, Debbie, be sure to take some of those treats with you. Sweet dreams!

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  57. Jo, you join so many others who love colonial times, especially here at Colonial Quills as you can see. Glad you came by, 'tis a pleasure meeting you.

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  58. Good morning,
    I so enjoyed reading your posts. I am sipping pumpkin spice tea right now, so I'm sure gingerbread would go quite well. I don't really know much about my ancestors. I have heard of one, who was a red-headed doctor.
    may_dayzee(AT)yahoo(DOT)com

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  59. Hello, Kay! Your pumpkin spice tea sounds wonderful. I enjoyed a cup of pumpkin spice coffee today and a pumpkin donut when my dear friend brought them by for me to enjoy. A red-headed doctor...it is interesting that so many folks share little tidbits of family lore like that. We had someone who came over on the Mayflower, but no one knew who just that "a Walton came over on the Mayflower". What this really meant is someone in the Walton family came over on the Mayflower, which was not the case, it was from the maternal side of the family, not maternal side. You see, I had to investigate that! Well, maybe if I did a little deeper...

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  60. Ladies, I am humbled and so happy about this win! Thank you so much! See you at the next tea party!

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