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Friday, April 29, 2016

"White" by Denise Weimer -- Reviewed by Carrie Fancett Pagels


White: The Restoration Trilogy by Denise Weimer

Reviewed by Carrie Fancett Pagels

Blurb: As historic preservationist Jennifer and brooding bachelor Michael restore his ancestors' historic doctor's residence in a rural Georgia community, they uncover the 1920s-era prejudice and secrets that caused Michael's branch to fall off the family tree. Jennifer's determined to fulfill her first professional position with integrity even if her employer lacks a proper appreciation of history. Far more challenging – and sinister – than the social landscape of Hermon are the strange accidents hinting that someone doesn't want them on the Dunham property. Yet Michael's and Jennifer's own pasts pose the biggest obstacles to laying a fresh foundation of family and community.
The doctor's house for Denise Weimer's book "White"
This historic Christian fiction by Denise Weimer is the first in a trilogy that will eventually go back to colonial times in America. This first book, White, defies genres. While it is set in contemporary Georgia, there are flashbacks to the early 1900s to the life of a doctor and his apothecary shop. 
Apothecary shop for Denise Weimer's novel, "White"

The title simply and succinctly portrays the plots main issue -- multi-racial families. White has the "feel" of a historical fiction with strong romantic elements. Strong writing, vivid characterization, and a multi-layered plot will keep the reader turning the pages to find out what happens next.  

One of the things I loved about Ms. Weimer's story, White, is the subtlety she had in inferring certain "truths" in the story. One major one is the relationship between the heroine and her supervising female professor. Ms. Weimer never has to come out and "tell" the reader what is going on, what the dynamics are, and so she doesn't insult the readers intelligence by doing so. I really appreciated that. She has a similar deft hand with other situations, gently adding threads about the heroine's past that allow the reader to finally see the whole tapestry of why she behaves and thinks as she does.

Nicely done!

Thank you Denise Weimer for the advance PDF of the copy. I am under no compulsion to post a positive review and my opinions are my own.

Question: Have you read any books where there are flashbacks to the past? Did this help give a mainly contemporary story a "historical" feel?



10 comments:

  1. Great review Carrie! The pictures are great too. Sounds like an interesting book.

    Congratulations on your book Denise Weimer!

    I have read books that have flashbacks to the past and enjoy them. Yes, some do give it a historical feel.

    Blessings,Tina

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    1. Hi Tina, Thanks! I think you would enjoy this book! Glad you are on board with the CQ crew now!

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    2. It is on my very, long to-be-read list.
      Thank you Carrie, I am happy to be here on CQ.
      Blessings, Tina

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  2. I have read books that flashback. Some felt historical and others didn't. This sounds like a great book and I can't wait to read it.

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  3. Thanks, ladies! Maybe you can fit in some extra summer reading. God bless!

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  4. I have read books like that, but can't think of any specific examples right now. I know I've always enjoyed that aspect of the books. I did read a couple of novellas not too long ago that were written by two different authors about the same event--one in the late 1800's and one in present day. That was an interesting angle and I thought each story was enhanced by the other. I read the historical one first, so I did think the contemporary one had a bit of a historic feel, especially since the setting was the same. The book was Snowflake Tiara by Angela Breidenbrach and Valerie Comer.

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  5. Sounds like a fabulous book, Denise. I'm not sure if I have read a book with flashbacks, but it certainly sounds interesting!

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  6. One of the things that really made the era of Georgia Pearl come alive was combing through old newspapers on microfilm at the library. Gave me a feel for the 1920s in Georgia. I could not believe how different it was, even just going back less than 100 years! Thanks, ladies, for stopping in!

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