Winter Tea Party winners: Angela's book,THE SCARLET COAT, will go to: Print copy- Andrea Stephens; e-book copy - Catherine Wight!

LUCY REYNOLDS has a table topper quilt on the way, and winners of the Valentine Ebook Collection are: Deanna Stevens, Caryl Kane, Anne Payne and Winnie Thomas. With thanks to all who joined in!

Wednesday, September 18, 2013

Sandwich, anyone? By New CQ Contributor Amber Perry


Sign for Historic Sandwich
Sandwich, anyone?
by Amber Perry

I have been obsessed with all things colonial and Revolutionary War since I was knee-high-to-a-grasshopper. I’ll never forget the day, at the ripe old age of fifteen, when my parents told me they were taking me to Boston so I could tour the historic sites. I was jumping up and down, and squealing so much you’d have thought I’d won back-stage passes to see The Backstreet Boys in concert.
But for me, this was WAY better than that. I mean, way better.
Newcomb Tavern, known in the Revolutionary era
as Tory Tavern 
While there, on a whim we decided to visit Cape Cod, since it is just about an hour or so from the city.
Little did I know, from that day on I would never be the same.
I remember sitting in the back seat of the rental car, inhaling that new-car smell and marveling at the beauty that dashed past my window when my dad said, “This little town is called Sandwich.”
Of course that got my attention. Sandwich? Who names a place after something you eat? Well, now I can look back and say, “Oh, Amber dearest, how cute and uneducated of you.”


Hoxie House, built in 1675
Once I got over the name, I was captivated by the quaint, historic homes and the magnificent setting. I promised myself that someday, I would go back. I’m sure I’ve never seen a more beautiful little town—and one with such fabulous history that is unknown to most people, unless you’ve been there. (Though I’m sure that can be said for many towns in the U.S.) I never forgot Sandwich, and if you have ever been there, I’m sure you can’t forget it either. * wink *



Inside the Hoxie House

Sandwich, Massachusetts was founded in 1637 and is the oldest town in Cape Cod. Named after a seaport town in England, the land was originally part of the Plymouth Colony. About sixty families first settled the area, and it continued growing after that, however slowly.









Shawme Pond
The Quakers of the colonial era were often persecuted in many places, but found a bit of refuge in Sandwich and the religion began to thrive. In fact, the Monthly Quaker Meetings held in Sandwich, are the oldest continual Quaker meetings in America. So says the Sandwich “historical” website . . .




View of Newcomb Tavern across Shawme Pond




During the Revolutionary War the colonists of Sandwich were very supportive of the patriot cause, but as with most places, there were a number of Tories who insisted on making their own strong feelings known. A well-beloved proponent of the patriot cause, Doctor Nathaniel Freeman, was a fearless leader among the patriots of Sandwich and after a political rally, was attacked by three Tories in front of Newcomb Tavern. If I could, I would reeeeeaaaally like to tell you all about the drama that ensued between the Whigs and the Tories in my favorite Cape Cod town, but I will have to leave that for another post.


Dexter's Grist Mill
Mainly a farming community during the colonial era, Sandwich has a large, centrally located pond (more like a small lake) that people and livestock used on a daily basis. On the pond stands a gristmill, powered by Shawme Pond, that was originally built in 1640 and still grinds corn today!

If I could, I would visit Sandwich every year. No, scratch that—if I could, I would LIVE there, but alas, I fear that will never happen. *sigh* But I do love it and hope to go back again someday.


Inside the gristmill

Have you ever been, and if so, what did you think?

Tell me about your favorite historical town!


27 comments:

  1. Amber, welcome to Colonial Quills. You are in great company! This was a very interesting post.
    Makes me think of the Earl of Sandwich. I read that he ordered roast beef between 2 slices of bread, as not to get his hands greasy while continuing to play cards...the first sandwich. Not sure if the town has anything to do with him, though.
    I've never been to an historical town, but it sounds great.

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    1. Hi Debbie! Thank you for the warm welcome! :) I have heard the same story about the Earl of Sandwich. LOL I'm sure he had no idea the craze he was starting. I don't know if the town in England was named after him, but its possible. Makes me want to look it up....
      Thanks again and God bless!

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  2. Thank you for sharing your love for Sandwich, Amber. What a lovely place! I hear that Newcomb Tavern is now a private residence and can be rented...Wouldn't staying there be the quintessential Sandwich experience? To walk where those intrepid patriots walked would be a dream-come-true for me.

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    1. Hey Katherine! ;) Yes, Newcomb Tavern can be rented, and believe you me, I will be doing that someday! Hugs!!

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  3. Welcome to Colonial Quills, Amber! I'd not heard of Sandwich, Massachusetts before, but after reading your article (and seeing the photos), it's definitely a place I'll want to visit.

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    1. Cynthia! Thank you for stopping by! Yes, I am sure you would love to visit there--and let me know how you like it. :) I really appreciate your warm welcome. God bless!!

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  4. Welcome to Colonial Quills, Amber. I enjoyed your post and your enthusiasm for the Revolutionary War. Isn't it amazing to find a special place like Sandwich where you can absorb the history, close your eyes and breathe it in, and feel your blood stir and your imagination catch fire? I’m grateful to people who love history enough to restore those special places and keep the past alive.

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  5. Oh Amber, what a WONDERFUL post and I so enjoyed the visit to Sandwich! And I REAAAAALY want to know what happened between the Tories and Patriots there!!! Maybe that could be your next post!

    I don't know that I have a favorite historic town. I love them all! I've never been to Sandwich but I've visited Plimouth Plantation and my ancestor, John Alden's, home in Duxbury. Most of my historical tours in MA were in the Boston area and near Arlington, where I grew up.

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    1. Hi Elaine! Thank you so much for commenting! How fun that you grew up near Arlington! So jealous! LOL And yes, I think I will post about the excitement between the Whigs and Tories for next, time, great suggestion! :)

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  6. Wonderful post, Amber. Now I want a sandwich;) I feel a book in the making here and hope you write one! The area is so beautiful and rich in history. Thanks for the great pics, too. Makes me want to plan a road trip...

    I think the spot that is most dear to me (well, one of them anyway) is Fort Boonesborough on the Kentucky River where Lael's story, The Frontiersman's Daughter, was born. I grew up there and so it is always with me. But I love Colonial Williamsburg and Old Sturbridge Village in Massachusetts, too.

    You're a wonderful addition to CQ:) Thank you.

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    1. Laura! You are such a great friend! :) I would love to see that Fort in KY, I bet its amazing. I just eat that stuff up! I too love CW and Sturbridge Village. I hope to go back some day soon. Thanks for reading my post, you made my day! HUGS!!

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  7. Amber, I love Cape Cod. Thank you for the lovely tour of Sandwich! I've passed through Sandwich many times and have always loved the quaintness of it, which is common to many Cape Cod towns. But I have never explored it historically as you have and enjoyed your historical tour. I don't know that I have a favorite historical town, but the historically shipbuilding village of Duxbury, Massachusetts, is very dear to my heart as the setting of my historicals. Congratulations on your first CQ post! Well done!

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    1. Hi Lisa! I am so glad you commented, and thank you for your warm welcome and encouragement!! :) I have never been to Duxbury, but it sounds amazing--and a place to set your stories! Fun!! Thank you again, Lisa, and God bless!!

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  8. AMBER!!! SUPER CONGRATS on your very first post to Colonial Quills, and I must say, it's a "tasty" one!!

    Sandwich sounds like my kind of town and the pics??? GORGEOUS, especially Dexter's Grist Mill!! Fun and interesting piece, my friend and SO makes me want to go. Were you ever a travel writer??? If not, you should be!!

    Hugs!!
    Julie

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    1. Julie! SO sweet of you to come by!! Thank you very much. I wish I could have shared all the pics I had from my visit to Sandwich, because they are all amazing. Such a pretty place. And yes, its very tasty. LOL Love you!!

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  9. Congrats on your first CQ post, Amber. Sandwich looks and sounds like a wonderful place to visit.

    I have visited relatively few colonial places, as I seem to keep setting my stories out on the frontier away from even the forts that Laura mentioned. And I didn't decide to start writing 18th century set fiction until I moved to the west coast, so getting back there to travel and explore is difficult now. Growing up, my family was more interested in the Civil War era, and I was woefully uneducated about anything prior to that time. However we did live quite close to Mt. Vernon, and visited that a few times. I have fond and vivid memories of that house and grounds.

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    1. Hi Lori! Isn't Mt Vernon fabulous!? I am also on the West coast and getting back east where all the cool stuff is, is so hard to do. :( But your settings are fabulous and you certainly don't HAVE to visit tons of historical places to be able to bring it to life, you do a great job!

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  10. Love the pictures - and the post, Amber! Reminds me of a trip we took to Boston, Concord and Lexington nine years ago. It was so beautiful back there, and I couldn't get over just how old some of the houses are. Makes the old houses where I'm from in the West look almost brand new. :)

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    1. HAHA isn't that so true?! But then again, after your trip to Scotland, the "old" houses in New England look new in comparison to the stuff you were touring! LOL Thank you for coming by, Stacy! HUGS!!

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  11. AMBER, welcome to CQs. I am a contributor on Overcoming With God, but they have a rocking chair with a goose down pillow reserved for me over here for when I guest post reviews for wonderful Colonial era authors! What an interesting post! I just ate a half of a peanut butter sandwich which I seldom do...I must have been catching your vibes over here. lol

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  12. Great post, Amber. Love the pictures. Is your Nathanial inspired by Dr. Freeman? ;)

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  13. Welcome to CQ, Amber!! Lovely first post. Isn't it just unforgettable the first time you're gripped by history fever? Loved reading about this town!

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    1. Oh, and I'd have to say that my favorite historical towns...there's a tie, sorry...are Camden SC, and Charleston SC. Both have their own amazingness, but as you say, that's a matter for another post!

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  14. I have only been to Cape Cod once, but I love Cape Ann and have visited it often. Amber, your photos of Sandwich and your bits of its history certainly call for a trip!

    My daughter and I recently traveled along the north shore of Cape Ann and I made her stop quite often for photos of those houses which screamed COLONIAL NEW ENGLAND. Now that it's fall, it's very difficult not to run off in that direction.

    Thanks for sharing your Sandwich!
    I'm looking forward to getting to know you and for more delicious posts!

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    1. PS - I can't pick a favorite historical town. Williamsburg is a given, Savannah where you can walk through two centuries within a few blocks, Boston... but I have to really try and figure out my favorite tiny little town.

      The fact you were so excited by history at 12 is amazing, and very rare!

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  15. What a great post, Amber. And welcome aboard Colonial Quills. The pictures really show the charm of Sandwich. Sandwich is in fact a village in the County of Kent, England. The food now known as a sandwich was actually named for the 4th Earl of Sandwich who liked his meat tucked between two pieces of bread.

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  16. Interesting post, Amber! I love historic towns! I live within a couple of hours of the fort Laura spoke of, & that's not the only fort in Ky. - there's so much history here, you & Lori should come down for a visit!

    bonnieroof60(at)yahoo(dot)com

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