April Tea Party Winners

Six Year Blog Anniversary WINNERS: Carla Gade - Pattern for Romance audiobooks go to Andrea Stephens and Megs Minutes and winner of Love's Compas is Terressa Thornton, PEGG THOMAS's signed copy of The Pony Express Romance Collection is Debra Smith, Janet Grunst's debut book goes to Kathleen Maher, Carrie Fancett Pagels' winner's choice goes to: Connie Saunders, Denise Weimer's print winner of, Angela Couch's winner's choice goes to Susan Johnson, Debra E. Marvin reader's choice of any of her novellas or a paperback of Saguaro Sunset novella -- Teri DiVincenzo and Lynne Feurstein, Jennifer Hudson Taylor's "For Love or Country" go to: Lucy Reynolds, Bree Herron and Mary Ellen Goodwin, Shannon McNear's winners are Becky Dempsey for Pioneer Christmas and Michelle Hayes for Most Eligible Bachelor, Roseanna White's winner for Love Finds You in Annapolis is Becky Smith.

Monday, March 18, 2013

AMERICA’S FIRST CIVIL WAR

AMERICA’S FIRST CIVIL WAR



When most Americans hear the term civil war, they might think of the war fought from 1861-1865, when our nation was torn apart by those sympathizing with either the confederate or the union leaning states. In reality our first civil war, The Revolutionary War, was fought nearly one hundred years before. Like the Civil War of the 1800’s, the Revolutionary War divided families and communities in their loyalties.

John Adams was known to have said that about thirty-three percent of the American populace supported the Patriot cause, thirty three percent sided with the Loyalists, and thirty-three percent were undecided. Historians later estimated that only twenty percent of the colonists desired to stay united with England. Obviously, those who supported the patriot cause were influential and intent on pursuing independence. Those who remained neutral wavered in their support depending upon which side appeared to be winning at the time. There were a myriad of reasons why people aligned themselves with the Loyalist or the Patriot cause.

Who remained loyal to the crown, and why?
           
Those who held jobs by virtue of their allegiance to the crown:
~Royal Governors
~Lords and some of the gentry
~Leaders of the Anglican Church
~British troops
Other groups who supported the Loyalist cause:
~Those whose financial interests and business connections were tied to Britain
~Those who considered themselves British or had close family ties with England
~Some Native Americans believing England would win, and hoping the “invaders” would leave
~Some black slaves who were promised their freedom if they joined the British side
~Those who could not imagine the colonies winning against the world’s greatest navy and army

Who sided with the Patriot cause and why?

~Those who felt unjustifiable taxes were imposed on them without the requisite representation in the British Parliament 
~Those who preferred the previous government’s attitude of laissez faire, and resented George III’s growing interference in the life and commerce of the colonies.
~Those who were influential lawyers, planters and merchants as well as everyday men and women who believed they were entitled to live independently of English rule.
~Some Native Americans sided with the colonists, particularly when they were winning, and when the new Congress made a strategic plan to halt the settlement Indian lands at that time.
~Some black slaves were promised freedom by the Americans, others went to war with their masters or continued working where they were. Some black and white men fought together in the same units.


Many families were divided in their loyalties during the American Revolution.  Join me next month when I share about two very influential families that experienced such division.


12 comments:

  1. Interesting info. I know there were some on each side but not alot more. Knew many of the loyalist were english who still had dealings with england and often part of the gentry. I loved Gilbert Morris's Liberty Bell series which told a lot about the war.
    I cant wait to actually see some of the sites like Valley Forge, Mount Vernon. It will be exciting to see your history and am so glad I can do a tour which will show some of the history.

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    1. I agree, Jenny, Gilbert Morris provided informative as well as entertaining reading.Touring Revolutionary War era, as well as other historical locations, is fascinating. I hope you get to visit many of them.

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  2. Excellent article, Janet! You're very right about the Revolution actually being our 1st civil war. Opposing allegiances really did split families and alienate friends. And allegiances swung back and forth with the Continental Army's victories and defeats. It was a turbulent time, to say the least, filled with fascinating people on both sides. It's been mesmerizing to research the period!

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    1. Thanks for stopping by, Joan. You are right, it was a fascinating time with courageous people who put everything on the line against seemingly impossible odds.

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  3. Great history lesson, Janet. The part about black and white men fighting side by side surprised me...I learn something new every time I visit this blog. Thanks for sharing and God bless.

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  4. That was an interesting thing to learn, wasn't it Debbie? To think that in later years that became an issue. Thanks for stopping by.

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  5. Very true, Janet. It was a civil war on so many levels. I've spent the past few years researching the Iroquois involvement in the Rev War, and for them also it was a civil war. The Iroquois League was broken over it as some fought for the King, others for the Patriots. Staying neutral in New York was nearly impossible, for anyone.

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    1. I was intrigued by the Indians pragmatism when they considered whether to align with the Loyalist or Patriot cause. Thanks for your comments, Lori.

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  6. Wait! No fair! I'm salivating for part two. Wonderful information. Thank you for posting.

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    1. I am already gathering the details, Judith. Thanks for your enthusiasm.

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  7. Interesting article. I like learning about history of our nation. I have yet to read a book by this author so would welcome the chance to do so. The book sounds really good.
    JWIsley(at)aol(dot)com

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  8. Interesting article. I like learning about history of our nation. I have yet to read a book by this author so would welcome the chance to do so. The book sounds really good.
    JWIsley(at)aol(dot)com

    ReplyDelete

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