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Roseanna M. White was A CHRISTY FINALIST!!!

Roseanne M. White's winner is Connie Saunders . Elaine Marie Cooper's winner of a $10 Amazon gift card is Nicole Wetherington. Carrie Fancett Pagels’ winner of choice of ebook or paperback of Saving the Marquise's Granddaughter goes to Deanne Patterson and the White Rose teacup set goest to Lena Nelson Dooley . Angela Couch's winner of Threads of Love e-book is Melissa Henderson and Marguerite Gray is the winner of Mail-Order Revenge print. Denise Weimer's ebook of Redeeming Grace winner is Ashley Penn. Congrats all!!!

Friday, January 18, 2013

New York State and the American Revolution--Part I


According to the New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation, 
“Nearly one third of all the battles fought during the American Revolution were fought in New York State. The capture of Fort Ticonderoga, the Battles of Oriskany, Newtown and Saratoga are just a few of the major events that took place on New York soil.” http://nysparks.com/historic-preservation/heritage-trails/revolutionary-war/default.aspx

This is a four-part look at these important theaters in the war and New York’s vital role in our Nation’s Founding Struggle
By Kathleen L. Maher

Part I—Newtown

Where modern day Elmira, NY is now situated, an Indian village by the name of New Town set the stage for  an important battle in the American Revolution. Set on the Chemung River near Pennsylvania’s border, Newtown/Elmira is fringed by hills on the West and East, and it is along one of these hills to the East that General Sullivan staved off an ambush from the Iroquois leader Joseph Brant and British commander Colonel John Butler.


The Six Nations, four of whom had pledged their loyalty to the crown, had been attacking the settlers of south-central New York for years, trying to drive them out of their log homes and farmsteads. The Mohawk, Cayuga, Seneca and Onondaga tribes supplied the British from this fertile area, and General John Sullivan’s orders from Washington were to drive them out.

In August 29, 1779, Sullivan and 5,000 Continentals from New York, New Hampshire, and Pennsylvania had amassed on the shore of Chemung River on New Town’s northeast side. Rumors of an impending ambush roused the Patriot forces to clash with British and Iroquois warriors at the base of what is now called Sullivan’s Hill.
Sullivan's Monument
The casualties were not high but the lasting effect of the battle of Newtown was the disbanding of the Six Nations—the Iroquois were scattered, their villages burned, and their supplies were decimated. Washington instructed Sullivan to pursue the enemy all the way to Forts Niagara and Oswego, but Sullivan failed to accomplish these orders.
The British had lost their bread bowl, and a fierce ally in the war.

A plaque on the memorial site at Sullivan's Monument reads: The soldiers in Sullivan's army were surprised to find cultivated fields and beautiful orchards. Following the war many returned to settle here. Some historians contend that opening the Indian lands for settlement was General George Washington's ultimate purpose for Sullivan's expeditions.

"The immediate objects are the total destruction and devastation of their settlements, and the capture of as many prisoners of every age and sex as possible. It will be essential to ruin their crops now in the ground and prevent their planting more."

General George Washington



11 comments:

  1. I have such mixed feelings as I read this post. The Indian nations have now been all but decimated. I wonder what it must have been like to have been in their situation. Having to make choices about which side to support. On the other hand, having just researched Pontiac's rebellion and having read an account of what many of those who participated in the attack did, yikes! And what they believed at that time some too gross to consider but think Last of the Mahicans and you'll get it. But the British were brutal, too, and no doubt the Americans. Great posts, Kathy! I am becoming philosophical today!

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  2. Even though it makes for great novels, it breaks my heart thinking about the lives lost during those times. I can't help but sympathize for the Indians, even though I know they did their share of killing. White man and Indian alike fought because of fear and pride. I guess my true sympathy is for the women and children who had no choice in the matter. On another note, it totally amazes me to read about the courage of those preachers and scouts! Like missionaries today, they show just how much trust they have in God.
    Great post Kathleen. Enjoy your weekend!

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  3. I am so glad you are doing this, Kathleen. I know many Americans, and plenty of New Yorkers included, don't realize much of the historical significance of New York state during the French and Indian War, Revolutionary War and War of 1812. Given all this history upstate and the incredible Native American history that precedes and overlaps U.S. history, it's a shame NY seems to have been minimized to Manhattan Island.

    I love that old map! My home and neighborhood sits on a Haudenesaunee village land. I'm not proud of the breaking of treaties, nor can I do anything about it, but I respect it and at times think of my view through the eyes of people who lived here only 250 years ago.

    Twenty five minutes away is where I work and the site of a huge village slaughtered during Sullivan's campaign. There is a burial mound there so it's something I don't forget.


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  4. Kathy--

    I have to agree with the above comments; thanks so much for posting this series and bringing our attention to New York State's part in the Revolution. Great Britain had decided that New York was strategic enough that if they could divide the state, they could split the colonies.

    The comments about the Native Americans are important too; (thanks Deb) as the Iroquois still make up a good portion of our urban population and play a strong role in N.Y. politics.

    p.s. I recently read a comment concerning our present political situation in this country by a Mohawk who said "If you want to know if you can trust the Federal Gov. --just ask an Indian!"

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  5. Kathy--

    I have to agree with the above comments; thanks so much for posting this series and bringing our attention to New York State's part in the Revolution. Great Britain had decided that New York was strategic enough that if they could divide the state, they could split the colonies.

    The comments about the Native Americans are important too; (thanks Deb) as the Iroquois still make up a good portion of our urban population and play a strong role in N.Y. politics.

    p.s. I recently read a comment concerning our present political situation in this country by a Mohawk who said "If you want to know if you can trust the Federal Gov. --just ask an Indian!"

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  6. What a great post, Kathleen. Like the others have stated, it's hard not to have mixed feelings about the conflict between the native Americans and the European Americans. Nice pictures, too.

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  7. I love Pat's comment, "If you want to know if you can trust the Federal Gov. --just ask an Indian!" I would add ". . . or many modern day Americans".

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  8. Yes, it's so true. What happened to the Natives is nothing short of genocide, and it aches in my heart. Locals claim that there is curse over our land because of the way the Iroquois were driven out and slaughtered and starved. Historical documents show that there was a drought and all the crops shriveled up in the years following Sullivan's campaign. And the earliest writings claim that food crops were huge prior to this, and they compared it to the promised land. Makes one wonder. . .
    But the earliest white settlers were certainly brave and endured great hardship to come this far west.
    Thank you everyone for reading and leaving such insightful comments. Deb and Pat, we are going to have to out NY back on the map! ;)

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